Bengals trade down in first round to get veteran tackle Cordy Glenn from Bills

CINCINNATI  — The Bengals traded down in the first round of next month's NFL draft to get a much needed left tackle, the club confirmed Wednesday.

The Bengals gave up their No. 12 pick to get six-year veteran Cordy Glenn from the Bills and Buffalo’s No. 21 pick. The Bengals also got the Bills’ fifth-round pick (158th overall) in exchange for Cincinnati’s sixth-round selection (187th).

“The offensive line has been an offseason focus for us,” said head coach Marvin Lewis. “We are excited to acquire a player who has been an accomplished starting tackle in the league. Cordy is young and proven, and he’s excited about being here.”

Glenn, 28, has been a Bills starter since being selected in the second round of the 2012 draft out of Georgia. Glenn has been dominant in both pass protection and run blocking. He was part of a Bills team that led the NFL in yards rushing in both 2015 and '16.

But Glenn was limited to six games last year due to a left-foot injury that eventually required surgery. He also hurt his right ankle.

Glenn, who has three years left on a five-year, $60 million contract, will be a bargain at $11,250,000 this year if he stays healthy.

The Bengals had to make a move to shore up the O-line after last year's disaster.

The offense finished last in the league in large measure because its line couldn't protect quarterback Andy Dalton or open holes for the running backs.

The Bengals ranked 20th in allowing 40 sacks and 31st in yards rushing last year.

Cedric Ogbuehi took over at left tackle after Andrew Whitworth was allowed to leave as a free agent a year ago. Andre Smith was signed from Minnesota to play right tackle, which was Ogbuehi's spot. The arrangement didn't work.

Offensive line coach Paul Alexander was fired after the season, indicating an overhaul on the line was coming.

The Associated Press reported the trade Monday, but teams were not allowed to announce trades until the NFL's new business year opened Wednesday.

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