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OSHP: Fatigued man causes traffic backup when he crashes at I-75 Monroe rest stop

Man sent to hospital with serious injuries
Fatigued man crashes at I-75 Monroe rest stop
Posted at 7:19 AM, Nov 15, 2016

MONROE, Ohio -- A Springboro man is in the hospital with serious, but non-life threatening, injuries after Ohio State Troopers say he drove off the right side of I-75 and struck a parked semitractor-trailer around 5:35 a.m. Tuesday.

Thirty-two-year-old Adam Gillie was heading northbound just south of the SR 63 exit on I-75 when police say he struck the rear of a truck parked at the roadside rest area.

His 1999 Chevrolet pickup truck overturned, trapping and partially ejecting Gillie. He was transported to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center by helicopter.

 

Trooper Christopher Creech said Gillie is a firefighter/EMT who had just finished a 24-hour shift.

The crash backed up traffic for about two hours. Troopers say he was wearing a seat belt, which minimized his injuries. They attribute the crash to fatigue, saying they didn’t suspect alcohol or drugs.

Ohio state troopers, Fairfield Township fire and EMS and Liberty Township fire and EMS assisted on the scene. The incident remains under investigation by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

There are more crashes involving sleepy drivers this time of year with the time change, according to Mike Belcuore with AAA driving school.

"If you start feeling that tired, don't try to push that extra mile," he said.

Sleepy drivers cause more than 6,400 deaths a year, according to AAA.  One in every three drivers admits they've driven tired. Belcuore said it's similar to drinking and driving.

"People don't realize how tired they are and then they get in the car," he said. "You're doing long trips, interstate driving, monotonous, and suddenly you get lulled into sleep and that's when problems happen."

Belcuore recommended anyone who feels tired while driving pull over, walk around and do some stretches. Also be well-rested before starting a long drive.

"It's better to be five to 10 minutes later than have something happen like today," he said.