From The Vault: Presidential candidates at their best (and worst) in Cincinnati

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CINCINNATI – Bring it, Donald Trump.

So you're coming to Cincinnati Oct. 13 for your first campaign rally here. Better late than never. But you've got some tough acts to follow.

Whether or not Ohio will decide this presidential election, candidates and their surrogates have made Cincinnati an important stop on their campaigns through the years. And some of their visits have been show stoppers.

A candidate mispronounced Cincinnati. Another condemned WLW talk-show host Bill Cunningham for belittling his opponents. Hollywood stars joined Ronald Reagan on stage. Sarah Palin congratulated Bengals' fans after a victory – when the team was 0-8.

Here are some memorable campaign visits  "From The Vault:"

John Kennedy mispronounces Cincinnati during 1960 campaign speech downtown

1960: "Cin-ci-NOT-e."

That's how John Kennedy mispronounced Cincinnati in a speech downtown. The crowd gasped. But he made a clever recovery and got a huge cheer and some laughs. JFK was also the only candidate we remember to make an in-house visit to a real family – not just for a fundraiser.  Hundreds of people crowded around Ethel Stiel's home to get a handshake or just a glimpse of the President-to-be.

Richard Nixon says 'sock it to 'em' on 1968 whistle-stop tour

1968: "Sock it to 'em."

 The funniest TV comedy show ever, Rowan and Martin's "Laugh-In," was a big hit when Richard Nixon was making his second run for the White House. Nixon was probably the un-funniest candidate ever, so it was a shock to hear him steal a line from the show while making train stops through the region.

Rosalynn Carter charms Cincinnati in 1976

1976:  First Lady in Red.

At first, many Americans didn't pay much attention to Gov. Jimmy Carter, a peanut farmer from Georgia. The media gave as much coverage to his beer-guzzling brother Billy. But Rosalynn Carter, the candidate's wife,  captivated the country with her Southern charm. We followed her as she greeted people on Fountain Square.

Ronald Reagan brings stars to Cincinnati in 1980

1980: Star Wars.

Ronald Reagan was all about stars and military might. He brought Henry Kissinger, Bob Hope and Charlton Heston here on campaign trips. He espoused a strong defense, and that struck a chord with voters while Iran held hostages at the U.S. Embassy. Reagan came here two nights before the election for a rousing rally at the convention center. He left early but spoke to the crowd by phone from his limo.

John McCain rebukes Bill Cunningham during 2008 campaign stop in Cincinnati

2008: "McCain threw me under the bus."

Before the Ohio primary, local Republicans asked Cunningham to warm up the crowd before McCain's speech at Memorial Hall. Naturally, Cunningham attacked the leading Democratic candidates, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. But McCain thought Cunningham went too far and he said so - out loud and on TV.

Hillary Clinton: Bush 'shafted' American people

2008: "The American people got shafted."

Hillary Clinton went off on President Bush – and Obama – during a speech at Cincinnati State leading up to the Ohio primary. She won Ohio but lost the nomination.

Sarah Palin rallies local Republicans two days before 2008 election.

2008: You can't see Russia from Clermont County

No matter. Palin, McCain's running mate, brought a country star to sing and drew 7,000 people to the Clermont County Fairgrounds two nights before the election. It would have been a really big deal except …

Barack Obama draws 25,000 to rally at University of Cincinnati's Nippert Stadium in 2008

2008: Upstaged in Cincinnati

An Obama rally on the same night attracted some 25,000 people to the University of Cincinnati's Nippert Stadium. The cheers were deafening. "Two days and you can put an end to the politics that divide a nation," Obama said. "At this defining moment in history, you can give this country the change we need. And it starts right here in Ohio, right here in Cincinnati."

SEE more video and stories about Tri-State history in our "From The Vault" series.

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