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Woman follows passion in retirement as study shows more women optimistic about aging

Posted: 2:37 PM, Nov 29, 2018
Updated: 2018-11-29 19:37:31Z

New research shows women are more optimistic about aging and retirement than ever.

Jane Lafave is using retirement to follow her passion. She volunteers at a refugee resettlement agency, making sure people are prepared when applying for jobs.

Ironically, it took her leaving her job, to be able to do this.

“My whole career really was balancing my children and my husband, you know, my work and all that kind of thing,” Lafave says.

Lafave spent decades working as a certified public accountant, and she retired at the age of 57.

“It was just time,” she says. “I needed more time and space in my life to do things other than work.

That led her to the Ignatian Volunteer Corps, which placed her at the African Community Center.

For two days a week, she helps refugees adjust to life in a new country.

“This is just a great gift for me to serve other people who have had a much harder life than I’ve had,” Lafave says.

Lafave isn't alone.

A new survey from TD Ameritrade found women are increasingly viewing their retirement years with optimism.

“The Women and Aging Survey” found 62 percent of women said retirement will be, "the most liberating phase of my life," and 72 percent said after years of focusing on others, aging finally gives them an, "opportunity to focus on myself." Eighty-three percent said aging provides a fresh chance to "reach new goals."

Nearly 9 of 10 women surveyed said, 'it's important to me to retain a sense of higher purpose as I age.

“I feel that this is my time in life to give back,” Lafave says.

That's what she is doing here.

“I think that's one of the gifts of age is that we've become much more aware of purpose and the time is short and we need to use it.”