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Statistician calculates which American cities get an early start and which ones sleep in

Statistician calculates which American cities get an early start and which ones sleep in
Posted at 12:49 PM, May 08, 2017
and last updated 2017-05-08 12:58:49-04

CINCINNATI -- In order for the early bird to get the worm in Cincinnati, they’re likely rolling into work before 7:57 a.m. on any given day.

That's the median time that workers in the Queen City arrive on the job as calculated by Nate Silver, the statistician founder and editor in chief of FiveThirtyEight. Silver recently used Census Bureau data collected through the American Community Survey to determine the median start time of each American metro area's work day.

The Queen City falls in the same ballpark as other Midwestern cities’ median start times. Columbus is at 7:59 a.m. and Cleveland is at 8 a.m., but Indianapolis ekes out a slim margin over us at 7:54 a.m. Cincinnati is also just off the national median start time of 7:55 a.m.

Hinesville, Georgia, boasts the honor of America’s earliest work start time, with the median worker getting to the office at 7:01 a.m. Silver hypothesizes that the military presence of Fort Stewart and the Army’s Third Infantry Division could be to blame.

New York City holds true to its moniker as the city that never sleeps with the latest median start time for work: 8:24 a.m.

Examine Silver’s full findings and fancy charts at the website here.

Remember seventh-grade math class? The median is the middle point of a number set as opposed to the average, which is the sum of all the numbers divided by how many numbers are in the set.