'Houston, I Have A Problem:' Potholes frustrate residents

CINCINNATI – “You can't miss the potholes!”

That's how one woman describes the road leading to her home.

She needed help getting it fixed, so she called "Houston, I Have A Problem!"

Crystal Scott lives at the end of Fenton Avenue and runs a day care out of her house. That’s where construction crews are building the Lick Run Greenway Project, and she says heavy trucks and equipment have been tearing up the road.

She said it got so bad she and her neighbors tried to fill the potholes themselves.

"As you go up (the road), you can see the different patches that we tried to do ourselves," Scott said.

Scott said the street has had pothole problems for years but the Lick Run Project has made them worse.

“I have a Honda Odyssey and it's pretty low. Every pothole there is, I'm hitting it," she said.

Not only that, Scott says her bumpy, pothole-ridden street is costing her business and money.

"When my parents come down, they can't miss the potholes,” she said. “Or they will park all the way up there and have to walk down. When you're carrying an infant in a carrier, that gets time consuming."

Neighbors agree.

"They're absolutely terrible,” said Cleola Linton. “I've been here 15 years and i haven't seen any improvement in them. No one has come to talk to anyone."

The Metropolitan Sewer District is installing new storm sewers as part of the Lick Run project. Scott sent us a picture that she claims shows a semi that got stuck in the potholes.  

"They took off one at a time. It took them probably about 45 minutes. And then when he was leaving to go up, he was stuck because his tire was stuck in the holes,” Scott said.  “He kept trying. All the weight from the 18 wheeler, he was digging more holes into it."

I emailed the City of Cincinnati and Deb Leonard with MSD replied by saying once the new storm sewers along Fenton Avenue are installed and the project is done,  “we will be repaving the street with asphalt."

She also said that part of Fenton Avenue is a private street. That means the city is not responsible - property owners are.

Residents can request that the city take over a private street and maintain it in the future.

SEE how to convert a private street to public street here or below. 

If you have a problem and need help, send an email to houston@wcpo.com or leave a message at 513-852-1360.

 

 

 

 

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