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Mosquitoes test positive for West Nile in Wayne Township

West Nile Stock Image
Posted at 12:07 PM, Aug 28, 2019
and last updated 2019-08-28 12:07:41-04

WAYNE TOWNSHIP, Ohio — Mosquitoes tested positive for West Nile virus for the second time in Butler County this season, according to county health officials.

The mosquitoes were collected on West Elkton Road in Wayne Township and tested positive on Aug. 23.

While no humans have tested positive in the county, Butler County Health Commissioner Jennifer Bailer is encouraging residents to focus on prevention — and not to panic.

“Help the county eliminate sources of standing water on your property to prevent mosquito eggs from hatching and developing into biting adults that spread the disease,” Bailer said in a written statement.

Good breeding grounds for mosquitoes include:

  • Pool covers that collect water
  • Smaller pools with standing water
  • Birdbaths
  • Garden equipment that holds water
  • Clogged rain gutters
  • Trash bins and old tires
  • Uncovered boats or boat covers that collect water
  • Hollow tree holes or stumps

Mosquitoes also tested positive for West Nile at the end of July near the pond at Madison Township Community Park.

The virus affects the central nervous system and can be passed from mosquitoes to humans. Symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, rash and body aches.

RELATED: Mosquito in Clermont County tests positive for West Nile Virus

The Butler County General Health District monitors mosquitoes in the county for West Nile and other viruses. Luckily, the risk will continue to decrease as summer winds down.

“It's not unusual to have positive mosquitoes as the summer progresses,” said Carrie Yeager, Environmental Health Director for BCGHD. “As the summer heat fades, the number of mosquitoes testing positive decreases.”

Residents are always encouraged to protect themselves from mosquito bites by reapplying insect repellent every few hours, draining standing water, installing window screens in your home and wearing long sleeves and pants when outdoors.