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How are COVID-19 numbers in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky trending?

Coronavirus
Posted at 7:36 PM, Nov 15, 2021

COVID-19 cases have been dropping overall in Kentucky following a spike from the delta variant that ultimately caused the highest spike in cases since the start of the pandemic. Ohio and Indiana are still seeing small upticks in cases, but nothing like the delta spike.

Kentucky's cases have plateaued after declining for seven weeks in a row, Governor Andy Beshear said during a press conference on Monday.

"The top line here is it does look like we’ve plateaued. That’s not a reason to think that there is another surge,” he said. “It looks like we have plateaued on the positivity rate at about 5.5%. We are still at a very serious level."

In Kentucky, 2,611,059 people have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and 425,401 have already received booster shots.

For the first time in more than two weeks, Ohio’s 21-day COVID-19 case average exceeded 4,000 cases a day.

On Monday, the state averaged 4,012 cases in the last three weeks, according to the Ohio Department of Health. Oct. 27 was the last time the 21-day average was more than 4,000.

After cases surged in the summer due to the delta variant, Ohio saw a decrease in cases during the early fall. However, in recent weeks cases began to plateau and are showing signs of increasing again. Ohio recorded 3,927 cases in the last day.

As of Monday, 56.49% of Ohioans have received at least one dose of the vaccine, including 67.48% of adults and 60.04% of those 5 and older. Nearly 64,500 kids ages 5 to 11 in Ohio have started the pediatric vaccine.

More than 52% of residents have completed the vaccine, including 63.08% of adults and 55.48% of those 5 and older, according to the state health department.

In Indiana, cases dropped steadily following a significant spike in September, but have begun to uptick again throughout November.

On November 13, the Associated Press reported that four out of 10 Hoosier adults are still not fully vaccinated against COVID-19.