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Dog rescued from crevice at New York state park after being trapped for 5 days

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Posted at 4:05 PM, Oct 14, 2021
and last updated 2021-10-14 16:10:58-04

ULSTER COUNTY, N.Y. — A small dog was rescued from a rocky crevice in a New York state park after being trapped there without food or water for five days.

The 12-year-old dog named Liza was walking with her owner at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve in Ulster County when she fell out of sight into the crevice last Thursday, according to the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

Park staff attempted to access the crevice that evening and the days following, but they were unsuccessful until Tuesday evening. At that time, officials say a specialized plumbing inspection camera was used to reach the dog.

The New Jersey Initial Response Team was there to assist and its members were able to descend into the crevice to get the plumbing camera close enough to observe the dog moving in a narrow area, according to officials.

Eventually, one of the rescuers was able to get a modified, extended catch pole around the dog, which was lifted close enough to be placed into a rescue pack and brought to the surface at about 5 p.m. Tuesday.

The dog appeared to be unharmed.

Later, the Ulster County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals determined the dog, while hungry and thirsty, was in good health and it was reunited with its owner.

While under observation with the camera, officials say the dog was seen licking the damp walls of the crevice, likely providing itself with moisture that helped it survive.

Park officials want to remind all visitors that their regulations require dogs to be kept on leashes of no more than six feet at all times for the safety of the animals as well as of other visitors.