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Your top 9 favorite photo galleries of the year

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Posted at 7:05 AM, Dec 22, 2015
and last updated 2015-12-22 07:05:42-05

CINCINNATI -- Another year has come and gone, but it left behind several momentous events and dozens of unforgettable photos.

The following are the nine most-clicked galleries on WCPO.com as chosen by you -- the readers.

(Click the photos to view the corresponding galleries.)

2015 year in review

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No. 1: The I-75 overpass collapse

One of the first big stories of 2015 was also one of its most tragic.

While working on the old Hopple Street overpass, the structure collapsed, killing 35-year-old Brandon Carl.

The destruction and ensuing investigation and cleanup took crews almost a full 24 hours to clear, shutting down one of the region’s main traffic arteries for hours.

2015 year in review

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No.2: Renowned artist shoots nudes during Opening Day

Famous photographer Harvey Drouillard was in Cincinnati during the Opening Day festivities to shoot photographs of nude subjects around the city. 

Part of his photo shoot included the models out and about among the Opening Day crowd.

Drouillard enjoyed working in Cincinnati so much that he returned for another shoot during Major League Baseball’s All Star Week.

2015 year in review

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No. 3: Looking back at Cincinnati’s favorite escape

Kings Island opened in 1972 and has attracted millions of Cincinnatians and fans from across the world since then.

Over the years it has featured historic roller coasters and thrilling rides, to movie tie-ins and more.

The park is even part of television history via the Brady Bunch.

2015 year in review

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No. 4: It’s not a bird, not a plane – what is it?

An unknown meteorological phenomenon got people talking in the fall.

A strange cloud was spotted over the West Side and some feared it was the beginning of a tornado.

Even after much analysis from the National Weather Service, no one could say for certain what the cloud was.

2015 year in review

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No. 5: Floodwaters take over Cincinnati

Flooding isn’t new to Cincinnati, but the spring showers and snow melt in March brought major flooding.

The Ohio River crested to at least 57.74 feet during the mid-March floods.

Damage was widespread along the riverfront and some areas even declared a state of emergency.

2015 year in review

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No. 6: Moviemakers invade the Tri-State

Amid the making of “Carol” and “Miles Ahead,” Cincinnatians were particularly taken with the antics of James Franco and company.

The actor and auteur set up shop in Hamilton to film “The Long Home.”

The feature-length film also stars “The Hunger Games” actor and Kentucky-native Josh Hutcherson.

2015 year in review

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No. 7: Mourners line streets during Sonny Kim’s funeral

One of the saddest stories of 2015 was the shooting death of Cincinnati police Officer Sonny Kim.

The veteran officer and father was gunned down while responding to a call in June.

During the funeral procession for Kim, Cincinnatians lined the streets to honor their fallen hero.

2015 year in review

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No. 8: Lauren Hill's funeral - ‘Songs in the key of life’

It was one of the most inspiring and tragic stories of 2015.

College athlete Lauren Hill rallied the hearts of the city and the nation during her courageous battle with cancer.

Lauren inspired thousands to donate to cancer research and children everywhere to not give up during their own battles with illness.

Her doctors said she died listening to the song “Hero” on her iPod.

2015 year in review

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No. 9: Cincinnati celebrates pride amid historic rulings

It was a historic year for the right of gays and lesbians to marry.

After years of putting off the issue, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that marriage equality would be the law of the land.

The ruling didn’t end the struggles of many to receive benefits or get equal status, but thousands in Cincinnati -- where the landmark case started -- proudly celebrated it.