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Maximum Security's owner says horse will not run in Preakness; will appeal disqualification

Posted: 7:51 AM, May 06, 2019
Updated: 2019-05-06 09:59:09-04
Kentucky Derby

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The owner of Maximum Security says the horse will not run in the Preakness and will appeal his disqualification as the Kentucky Derby winner.

Gary West confirmed the decision by phone to The Associated Press. He says "there's really no need, not having an opportunity to run for the Triple Crown to run a horse back in two weeks."

Maximum Security became the first Derby winner to be disqualified for interference on Saturday. After an objection, racing stewards ruled that the colt swerved out and impeded the path of several horses between the far and final turns.

West has said he realizes the appeals process will take "months, if not years." The owner has sought to see replays of the race that stewards used to reach their landmark decision.

Bettors who wagered on Maximum Security in the Kentucky Derby only to see the colt get disqualified for interference will receive refunds.

Twinspires.com, Churchill Downs' online wagering service, tweeted that it will give back up to $10 to anyone who bet on Maximum Security to win in Saturday's Derby.

The company said $6,212,046 was bet on the colt to win. Maximum Security also had $1,495,408 bet to place and $1,272,082 wagered to show, so the disqualification cost those bettors about $9 million.

Country House, a 65-1 shot, was moved up to first place from second. The colt paid $132.40, $56.60 and $24.60.

Twinspires.com says $520,907 was wagered on Country House to win.

A $2 exacta wager — involving horses finishing first and second — paid $3,009.60. A $1 superfecta bet — involving the first four horses — returned $51,400.10.

Churchill Downs said wagering on the Kentucky Derby increased 10% to a record $165.5 million, surpassing the old mark of $149.9 million set last year. This year's wagering included $4.1 million bet in Japan, the first time the Derby was offered for wagering in that country. Master Fencer, the first Japan-bred to run in the Derby, was sixth.

The track said wagering from all sources on the 14-race card totaled a record $250.9 million, up 11% over last year's total of $225.7 million.

The attendance of 150,729 was down 4% compared with last year, with the forecast of all-day rain keeping fans away, although the heaviest rain didn't fall until about an hour before the Derby was run.