Highlands High School senior Helen Ross earns perfect score on ACT

FORT THOMAS, Ky. -- Highlands High School senior Helen Ross recently earned a perfect score of 36 on the ACT test. Nationally, less than one-tenth of 1 percent of all students who take the ACT earn a score of 36.

The ACT is required for all high school juniors as part of the annual state assessment in the spring of the school year. As a junior, Helen earned a score of 35.

A news release from Fort Thomas Independent Schools says challenging herself academically seems to be the norm for Ross. Throughout her high school years, she has elected to take an early bird class which added an extra class period to her school day. Additionally, each year her rigorous schedules have included Advanced Placement (AP) classes, beginning with one her freshman year, three her sophomore year, five her junior year and six her senior year.

“Helen is a wonderfully gifted student who has achieved at levels unparalleled to any other Highlands student,” said Trinity Walsh, Highlands High School guidance counselor. “Not only does she excel in the classroom, but she has earned accolades in academic competitions and is a dedicated mentor and student volunteer at Highlands and community programs. High school is merely a springboard for her future success, and I am excited to watch her college achievements.”

As for her long-term plans, Ross states that she has not yet selected a college and is currently considering career paths in entomology, mathematics, astrophysics and space science.

The ACT consists of tests in English, mathematics, reading and science. Each test is scored on a scale of one to 36, and a student's composite score is the average of the four test scores. Some students also take the optional ACT writing test, but the score for that test is reported separately and is not included within the ACT Composite score.

ACT test scores are accepted by all major US colleges. Exceptional scores of 36 provide colleges with evidence of student readiness for the academic rigors that lie ahead.

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