Videos: Watch 9 highs and lows from Pete Rose's baseball career

CINCINNATI – Watch 9 signature moments in Pete Rose's baseball career:

9. Game 5, 1972 World Series in Oakland: With Reds down three games to one and facing elimination, Rose hits leadoff home run and sparks Reds to a 5-4 victory.

8. Game 7, 1975 World Series at Boston: After Red Sox built 3-0 lead, Rose's seventh-inning single knocks in tying run and sets stage for Joe Morgan's series-winning single in the ninth.

7. Game 3, 1973 NL Championship Series at New York: Rose slides hard into second base trying to break up double play and starts bench-clearing fight with Mets shortstop Bud Harrelson.

6. 3,000th hit, Riverfront Stadium: Rose singles to left off Expos' Steve Rogers on April 29, 1978 and hugs friend and former teammate Tony Perez, playing first base for Montreal.

5. 4,000th hit, Olympic Stadium, Montreal: Playing for the Expos, Rose doubles to right off Phillies' Jerry Koosman on April 13, 1984. (Forward video to 2:25).

4. Rose shoves umpire Dave Pallone: Reds manager got 30-day suspension after this altercation on April 30, 1988 at Riverfront Stadium. He angrily confronted Pallone after the ump made a late, disputed, "safe" call at first base in the ninth inning, allowing a Mets runner to score the tiebreaking and eventual winning run.

3. Rose comes home: Five years after leaving the Reds, Rose returns in triumph as player-manager on Aug. 17, 1984 and gets two run-scoring hits - complete with head-first slides - in a 6-4 win over the Cubs at Riverfront Stadium.

2. 1970 All-Star Game at Riverfront Stadium: Rose plows into catcher Ray Fosse in the 12th inning to score the winning run for the National League.

1. Rose breaks Ty Cobb's MLB career hit record: Rose singles off Padres' Eric Show for his 4,192nd hit on Sept. 11, 1985 at Riverfront Stadium. (Watch complete on-field celebration and post-game highlights in the video player at the top of the page).

BONUS Video:An ESPN SportsCentury special examines Rose's career and the betting that led to his ban from baseball.

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