Here are the three questions jurors asked Judge Ghiz during Ray Tensing murder trial deliberations

CINCINNATI -- Court documents released Monday give a glimpse into the deliberation process during the second murder trial of ex-University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing.

Judge Leslie Ghiz kept all juror questions out of open court during the second trial. As with all other restrictions on media coverage and releasing information, Ghiz said she would not reveal jurors' questions to prevent 
tainting the jury pool and to soothe "community unrest" that "pulsate(d)" through Cincinnati.

"Publication of the jury questions …. would invariably lead to analysis or the expression of opinions on the jury and the case based on less than complete information, which could taint prospective jurors," Ghiz wrote in late June.

The questions were released Monday after Ghiz formally dismissed charges of murder and voluntary manslaughter against Tensing.

RELATED: What you should know about the jurors in Ray Tensing's retrial

The jury asked three questions during the 30 hours of deliberation. (Click on the dates to read the transcripts). 

On June 20, the jury asked Ghiz for a list of the defense witnesses. Ghiz agreed to reread the list of defense witnesses for the jurors.

Then, the jury asked Ghiz for a copy of the audio from Scott Roder, the defense's video analyst expert. Ghiz said she would not release audio or video from Roder's testimony.

"They have everything they need," Ghiz said, according to the court reporter's notes. "Everything that was submitted into evidence is with them in the back. So that is it."

On June 22, the jury asked Ghiz for the legal definition of passion and/or sudden passion. Ghiz replied, saying that the definition was in the jury instructions.

"I'm sure I could have told you that on the phone," Ghiz said.

RELATED: Sam DuBose's family blasts Judge Leslie Ghiz over Ray Tensing's second mistrial

The second Tensing trial jury was made up of seven white women, two white men, one black man and two black women. Two white men, one white woman and one black woman were alternates.

WCPO/Scripps is still in a legal battle with Ghiz over completed, unredacted juror questionnaires used to determine impartiality in the massive pool of potential jurors. 

NOTE: WCPO does not publish juror names or images that show jurors' identities without the permission of those jurors. However, WCPO believes it is important for journalists to be able to contact jurors and talk to them about what happened during the trial and deliberations -- if jurors are willing to talk.

For complete trial coverage, visit wcpo.com/TensingTrial.

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