COURTESY: CINCINNATI POST
Hide Caption

New pamphlet helps you assess landslide potential for your property

Is your property vulnerable to landslides?

a a a a
Share this story

CLIFTON, OHIO - The year was 1972, around midnight, on June 5 … the hill behind the Clifton South Apartments came sliding down, leaving a steep cliff, about thirty feet high where the parking lot once stood.

Professor Barry Maynard from the University of Cincinnati explains:

“When they built the apartment building they wanted a parking lot, so they brought in fill to level out the top of the hillside and that added weight and that reactivated an old landslide."

A steep hill with a top layer of soft shale makes for a dangerous combination, bringing an abundant amount of landslides due to development.

"Anytime you're close to the water or anytime you're on the edge of hill, you need to watch out," Maynard said

Now, there’s a new pamphlet called “Landslides and your property.” It can help you look for landslides in and around your property. It was put together by the University of Cincinnati and the Geological Surveys of Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. Duke Energy is supporting the project.

"It will have a description of the kinds of landslides that you can see in Cincinnati. You will have a description of tell tale signs to look for that you might have a landslide on your property," Maynard said.

The guide shows warning signs your property might be vulnerable to landslides, and what to do about it.

"For an individual homeowner, the best thing to do is look for signs of trouble, particularly along creeks. It's where it will show up first."

You can order the pamphlet from any of these locations:

 

Kentucky Geological Survey

895-323-0510

 

Indiana Geological Survey

812-855-7636

 

Ohio Division of Geological Survey

614-265-6578

 

U.S. Geological Survey Hazards

Landslides.usgs.gov

 

Hillside Trust of Hamilton County

513-855-7636

 

Northern Kentucky Planning Commission

859-331-8980

 

American Society of Civil Engineers, Cincinnati, Ohio Section

Cincyasce.org

 

The Natural Resources Conservation Service

Websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov

 

Like Sarah Walters on Facebook

Sarah Walters on Twitter: @Sarah_Walters

 

 

Copyright 2013 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Print this article

Comments

Hmm... It looks like you’re not a WCPO Insider. or Subscribe now to contribute!

More Weather News
Cold temps followed by rain/snow mix today
Cold temps followed by rain/snow mix today

Partly cloudy skies and a few flurries can be expected this afternoon, along with cold temperatures.

Spring's allergies to be among most brutal ever
Spring's allergies to be among most brutal ever

This allergy season could be among the most brutal to ever hit the Tri-State.

'Blood moon' a treat for skywatchers
'Blood moon' a treat for skywatchers

A special treat occurred for most of North America Monday night into Tuesday when the moon turned to blood – well, sort of.

Locals remember deadly tornado 15 years later
Locals remember deadly tornado 15 years later

Fifty-seven minutes of terror. That’s what residents of Blue Ash and Montgomery experienced 15 years ago Wednesday when a powerful…

Celestial event to bathe Tri-State in 'blood'
Celestial event to bathe Tri-State in 'blood'

A special treat is in store for the Tri-State next week when the moon turns to blood – well, sort of.

Tri-State among worst landslide areas in the US
Tri-State among worst landslide areas in the US

Washington isn’t alone in dealing with dangerous landslides. Local experts say the Tri-State has one of the highest landslide rates in…

40 years after outbreak, 'Xenia lives'
40 years after outbreak, 'Xenia lives'

Thursday marked the 40th anniversary of the 1974 Tornado Super Outbreak and the conditions are right for similar severe weather.

WATCH: Tom McKee recalls 1974 tornado outbreak
WATCH: Tom McKee recalls 1974 tornado outbreak

WCPO reporter Tom McKee recalls covering the Tornado Super Outbreak in 1974.

April arrives with bang; severe weather expected
April arrives with bang; severe weather expected

April showers may bring May flowers, but this week’s weather is going to bring more than just rain.

Spring is here, but temps don't always agree
Spring is here, but temps don't always agree

The Vernal Equinox, more commonly known as the first day of spring, arrives Thursday at exactly 12:57 p.m. with temperatures expected to be…