Report: NSA can access user data on all major smartphones

a a a a
Share this story

BERLIN (AP) -- The U.S. National Security Agency is able to crack protective measures on iPhones, BlackBerry and Android devices, giving it access to users' data on all major smartphones, according to a report Sunday in German news weekly Der Spiegel.

The magazine cited internal documents from the NSA and its British counterpart GCHQ in which the agencies describe setting up dedicated teams for each type of phone as part of their effort to gather intelligence on potential threats such as terrorists.

The data obtained this way includes contacts, call lists, SMS traffic, notes and location information, Der Spiegel reported. The documents don't indicate that the NSA is conducting mass surveillance of phone users but rather that these techniques are used to eavesdrop on specific individuals, the magazine said.

The article doesn't explain how the magazine obtained the documents, which are described as "secret." But one of its authors is Laura Poitras, an American filmmaker with close contacts to NSA leaker Edward Snowden who has published several articles about the NSA in Der Spiegel in recent weeks.

The documents outline how, starting in May 2009, intelligence agents were unable to access some information on BlackBerry phones for about a year after the Canadian manufacturer began using a new method to compress the data. After GCHQ cracked that problem, too, analysts celebrated their achievement with the word "Champagne," Der Spiegel reported.

The magazine printed several slides alleged to have come from an NSA presentation referencing the film "1984," based on George Orwell's book set in a totalitarian surveillance state. The slides - which show stills from the film, former Apple Inc. chairman Steve Jobs holding an iPhone, and iPhone buyers celebrating their purchase - are captioned: "Who knew in 1984...that this would be big brother...and the zombies would be paying customers?"

Snowden's revelations have sparked a heated debate in Germany about the country's cooperation with the United States in intelligence matters.

On Saturday, thousands of people in Berlin protested the NSA's alleged mass surveillance of Internet users. Many held placards with slogans such as "Stop watching us."

Separately, an incident in which a German police helicopter was used to photograph the roof of the American consulate in Frankfurt has caused a minor diplomatic incident between the two countries.

German magazine Focus reported Sunday that U.S. Ambassador John B. Emerson complained about the overflight, which German media reported was ordered by top officials after reports that the consulate housed a secret espionage site.

A U.S. embassy spokesman downplayed the story, saying "the helicopter incident was, naturally enough, the subject of embassy conversation with the Foreign Ministry, but no demarche or letter of complaint about the incident was sent to the German government."

---

Frank Jordans can be reached at HTTP://WWW.TWITTER.COM/WIREREPORTER

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Print this article

Comments

Hmm... It looks like you’re not a WCPO Insider. or Subscribe now to contribute!

More Technology News
5 features Amazon smartphone might offer
5 features Amazon smartphone might offer

Rumors of an Amazon smartphone reached a fever pitch this week, with several tech blogs speculating that the device could be due out this year.

An airline oops tops digital week in review
An airline oops tops digital week in review

Each week, we recap the stories and trends that made headlines in the digital world. Read on to see what you missed.

NASA's moon-orbiting robot crashes down
NASA's moon-orbiting robot crashes down

NASA's robotic moon explorer, LADEE, is no more. Flight controllers confirmed early Friday that the moon-orbiting spacecraft crashed into…

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear power
Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear power

Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy…

‘Liking' a brand on Facebook means you can't sue
‘Liking' a brand on Facebook means you can't sue

If you click ‘Like’ on your favorite brands or companies on Facebook, you could be signing up for more than you bargained for.

Facebook to launch new location-sharing feature
Facebook to launch new location-sharing feature

Facebook users in the U.S. will soon be able to see which of their friends are in close proximity using a new feature the company is…

Bust a move! Local teen dances to end bullying
Bust a move! Local teen dances to end bullying

He takes the stage to spread his anti-bullying message. Who is Jeff Bullis? Meet the 19-year-old West Chester, Oh. teen who is using his…

Hacker attack? NKU Cyber Defense Team can help
Hacker attack? NKU Cyber Defense Team can help

The students bested teams from nine states--including the University of Louisville--in a recent competition. Organizers described the cyber…

Scammers using Netflix to steal from millions
Scammers using Netflix to steal from millions

A dangerous new phishing scam is targeting the sensitive information of millions of Netflix users.

No geeks here: Tri-Staters flock to learn coding
No geeks here: Tri-Staters flock to learn coding

If the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of a computer programmer is someone sitting alone in a room, pounding away at a keyboard…