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Court says Apple did not violate Samsung patents

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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A Seoul court denied Samsung's claim that Apple violated three of its patent related to short message services.

A judge at Seoul Central District Court said Thursday that two of Samsung patents lacked "progressivity" and can be easily developed by others. He said one patent was not used in the iPad.

Samsung Electronics Co. sued Apple in March 2012 accusing the iPhone maker of illegally using its three patented technologies. It sought compensation and a ban on sales of six iPhone and iPad models, which include models still available in the market, such as the model with Retina display known as the fourth-generation iPad.

The judge said a similar technology exists with the Samsung patent that allows users to activate another application while typing text messages without losing the messages. Another technology that enables users to touch a notification box to check a full message can be invented easily, he said.

The ruling is the latest legal blow to Samsung, which owes Apple $930 million from two jury verdicts in Silicon Valley. Samsung is seeking to appeal both.

The world's top two smartphone makers have waged legal battles over mobile devices since 2011.

Samsung said it was disappointed by the ruling, saying it will determine whether to appeal this decision after a thorough review. Apple could not be reached for comment.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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