Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Photo courtesy Creative Commons
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BREAKDOWN: How the shutdown affects the Tri-State

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CINCINNATI -- The impact of the government shutdown rippled across the Tri-State Tuesday, as thousands of federal employees went on furlough and national military museums and parks closed in each state.

Here's how Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana are being affected:

OHIO

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force near Dayton and the Cuyahoga Valley National Park between Cleveland and Akron both closed in the aftermath of the shutdown that began at midnight after failure to break a budget impasse.

Some 8,700 civilian employees at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton had been notified earlier that they would go on unpaid leave when the shutdown began. The base has a total workforce of about 29,000, including civilian and military personnel. At the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force there, only three of 95 employees remained on duty to safeguard exhibits that include vintage military planes. The museum is a popular site for military reunions, and averaged 2,087 visitors daily in October 2012.

The congressional offices of Rep. Brad Wenstrup, R-Cincinnati, furloughed 70 percent of their staff Tuesday. The first-term congressman said he would donate his salary during the shutdown to Cincinnati's Freestore Foodbank and the Wounded Warrior project to benefit injured veterans.

The shutdown will also entail delays in government-backed mortgages and trimmed congressional staffs. A spokeswoman at the Dayton VA Medical Center said Tuesday that services for veterans continued as normal.

The Cuyahoga Valley park is crisscrossed by roads operated by local government, and much of it remained accessible Tuesday. However, park officials asked visitors to respect the shutdown and visit other areas of the historical canal towpath outside the national park.

The privately operated scenic railroad at the national park won't run during the shutdown because it needs park employees for help, park spokeswoman Mary Pat Doorley told the Associated Press.

KENTUCKY

Workers at Mammoth Cave National Park in Central Kentucky and the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace in Hodgenville reported to work Tuesday to begin the process of closing the parks, according to courier-journal.com.

Only one of 22 Abraham Lincoln Birthplace employees will remain on site and continue to be paid. At Mammoth Cave, gift shops, food services, canoe and horse liveries and a ferry across the Green River are closed, courier-journal.com reports.

It is unclear at this time if the Daniel Boone National Forest in Winchester is closing.

Federal courts will continue to operate for now, official said.

People who receive social security, Medicare or unemployment will still receive checks. Active duty military personnel will stay on duty, but their paychecks will be delayed.

According to wtvq.com, the special supplemental nutrition program known as WIC may shut down. The USDA reports more than 130,000 women, infants and children in Kentucky participated in WIC in 2012.

INDIANA

Social Security offices will be open, but services will be limited. They won't be able to process requests for new or replacement Social Security cards, replacement Medicare cards or benefit verifications, but they will be able to accept applications for benefits.

Federal courts will remain open. Three national parks in Indiana, including the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, will be completely closed.

According to indystar.com, if you are an air traffic controller at the Indianapolis International Airport, you're working as usual. But about 12,000 Indiana National Guard members not on active duty and 1,000 full-time technicians are staying home. Another 1,000 members on active duty are working, but won’t get a federal paycheck until government funding resumes.

Indystar.com also reports that more than 23,000 federal civilian employees in Indiana are being furloughed. The state’s 12,000 “weekend warriors” in the Army and Air national guards are also not reporting for duty during the shutdown.

IN ALL THREE STATES

The Federal Housing Administration, which insures about 15 percent of new loans for home purchases around the nation, said Tuesday it will approve fewer loans for its client base -- borrowers with low to moderate income -- because of reduced staff. The agency will focus on single-family homes during a shutdown, setting aside loan applications for multi-family dwellings. The Housing and Urban Development Department won't make additional payments to the nation's 3,300 public housing authorities, but the agency estimates that most of them have enough money to keep giving people rental assistance until the end of October.

Copyright 2013 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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