Police add Criminal Investigations Section to intensify search efforts for missing UC student

CINCINNATI -- Cincinnati police are adding more manpower to the search for UC student Brogan Dulle after no promising leads or updates surfaced since he disappeared early Sunday morning. 

Police experience an average of 1,500 missing person cases per year, but Lt. James Whalen said in a press conference Thursday that Dulle's disappearance is unique because they've gone five days with no clues. Police believe adding help from the Criminal Investigations Section will intensify search efforts, as the district has exhausted all leads thus far.

"We're talking to every single person we can find in the neighborhood," Whalen said. "It's unusual we don't get a phone call from somebody who saw something."

Police have also reached out to Cincinnati Metro because Dulle had no access to a vehicle and used public transit to get around.

Whalen said the district has responded to several possible sightings of the Anderson Township native, none of which have led to his whereabouts.

"When we get there, people haven't seen him," he said.

He encouraged the public to keep sending in tips through phone calls and social media, because the information could get them closer to finding Dulle.

Police have the student's laptop and tablet, but have not yet been able to access stored information.

In one of the earliest attempts to trace Dulle's steps, police pinged his cellphone. The signal reached a tower in the neighborhood they've searched, and indicated Dulle's phone battery lost charge at about 5 a.m. Sunday.

Volunteers in the hundreds were set to canvass the city Thursday, looking for any sign of him.

A group gathered at the parking lot between Chipotle and DuBois in Clifton Heights Thursday afternoon.

"First and foremost we wanted everyone to go home and take care of themselves and take care of their families, do what they need to do in their personal lives … set a plan and mobilize this afternoon," said Libby MacVeigh, Dulle's cousin.

Before the sun rose Wednesday morning, family members and friends of Dulle gathered in the same area and mapped out an expanded search area that included following up on possible sightings of Dulle submitted by the public.

“We wanted to talk to as many people at the same time to see if stories were coinciding,” MacVeigh said.

The family received tips on sightings of the education major in Over-the-Rhine and 8th Street and Garfield Place downtown, but none led to Dulle's location.

"I've cried, I've laughed, I've been emotionless," said MacVeigh of the search.

MacVeigh and other volunteers have spoken to numerous people, handed out fliers and enlisted the Greater Cincinnati’s Homeless Coalition to find the young man who disappeared without his cellphone, money and identification at about 2 a.m. Sunday.

The Coalition inserted leaflets describing Dulle into their Street Vibes publications sold throughout the city. The Drop Inn Center input Dulle's information and monitored their databases for anyone who matched his description.

"The homeless coalition sent out an email blast to all the homeless service providers in Hamilton County asking us to be on the lookout for the missing person," said Arlene Nolan, executive director for the Drop Inn Center.

Small groups of volunteers even searched the woods at McMillan Street and Reading Road for signs of Dulle.

TEXT THAT DISPLAYS IF IMAGE IS UNAVAILABLE (CAN BE BLANK)

A former roommate, Brad Ernst, walked innumerable streets with a picture of Dulle taped to his shirt.

"It's a way to do things," Ernst said. "People walking by people. It's been noticed and questions have been asked and I'm more than willing to spread the awareness. He was one of my best friends when I lived with him. He was unbelievable. We'd talk about TV shows, video games."

Friends and family of Dulle continued search efforts Wednesday night, braving the rain and storms. MacVeigh said volunteers drove up and down streets, hoping to see Dulle wandering around.

Cincinnati police developed a new game plan Wednesday night to look for Dulle as well.

“We're using technology; we're using the public,” said Cincinnati Police Capt. Mike Neville. “I have an investigator assigned to that and that only right now. I met with (the investigator Tuesday) night and (Wednesday) morning. We are ironing out what could be good leads.”

Police said Wednesday night that Texas Equusearch, a nation-wide search and recovery team, will help in the hunt for Dulle. Texas Equusearch provides experienced volunteer search efforts to reconnect missing persons with their loved ones.

Dave Rader, the director of Texas Equusearch's Ohio chapter, said he hopes to help guide Dulle's family in the right direction.

"To me it's a positive and that means we are looking for a live Brogan," he said. "To me, that's encouraging."

Earlier the Dulle family issued a statement, thankful for the outreach of family, police, and strangers.

We would like to thank everyone who has searched, posted, shared or tweeted in our efforts to find Brogan, including those who love him and know what a wonderful and caring young man he is,"

CINCINNATI -- Cincinnati police are adding more manpower to the search for UC student Brogan Dulle after no promising leads or updates surfaced since he disappeared early Sunday morning. 

Police experience an average of 1,500 missing person cases per year, but Lt. James Whalen said in a press conference Thursday that Dulle's disappearance is unique because they've gone five days with no clues. Police believe adding help from the Criminal Investigations Section will intensify search efforts, as the district has exhausted all leads thus far.

"We're talking to every single person we can find in the neighborhood," Whalen said. "It's unusual we don't get a phone call from somebody who saw something."

Police have also reached out to Cincinnati Metro because Dulle had no access to a vehicle and used public transit to get around.

Whalen said the district has responded to several possible sightings of the Anderson Township native, none of which have led to his whereabouts.

"When we get there, people haven't seen him," he said.

He encouraged the public to keep sending in tips through phone calls and social media, because the information could get them closer to finding Dulle.

Police have the student's laptop and tablet, but have not yet been able to access stored information.

In one of the earliest attempts to trace Dulle's steps, police pinged his cellphone. The signal reached a tower in the neighborhood they've searched, and indicated Dulle's phone battery lost charge at about 5 a.m. Sunday.

Volunteers in the hundreds were set to canvass the city Thursday, looking for any sign of him.

A group gathered at the parking lot between Chipotle and DuBois in Clifton Heights Thursday afternoon.

"First and foremost we wanted everyone to go home and take care of themselves and take care of their families, do what they need to do in their personal lives … set a plan and mobilize this afternoon," said Libby MacVeigh, Dulle's cousin.

Before the sun rose Wednesday morning, family members and friends of Dulle gathered in the same area and mapped out an expanded search area that included following up on possible sightings of Dulle submitted by the public.

“We wanted to talk to as many people at the same time to see if stories were coinciding,” MacVeigh said.

The family received tips on sightings of the education major in Over-the-Rhine and 8th Street and Garfield Place downtown, but none led to Dulle's location.

"I've cried, I've laughed, I've been emotionless," said MacVeigh of the search.

MacVeigh and other volunteers have spoken to numerous people, handed out fliers and enlisted the Greater Cincinnati’s Homeless Coalition to find the young man who disappeared without his cellphone, money and identification at about 2 a.m. Sunday.

The Coalition inserted leaflets describing Dulle into their Street Vibes publications sold throughout the city. The Drop Inn Center input Dulle's information and monitored their databases for anyone who matched his description.

"The homeless coalition sent out an email blast to all the homeless service providers in Hamilton County asking us to be on the lookout for the missing person," said Arlene Nolan, executive director for the Drop Inn Center.

Small groups of volunteers even searched the woods at McMillan Street and Reading Road for signs of Dulle.

TEXT THAT DISPLAYS IF IMAGE IS UNAVAILABLE (CAN BE BLANK)

A former roommate, Brad Ernst, walked innumerable streets with a picture of Dulle taped to his shirt.

"It's a way to do things," Ernst said. "People walking by people. It's been noticed and questions have been asked and I'm more than willing to spread the awareness. He was one of my best friends when I lived with him. He was unbelievable. We'd talk about TV shows, video games."

Friends and family of Dulle continued search efforts Wednesday night, braving the rain and storms. MacVeigh said volunteers drove up and down streets, hoping to see Dulle wandering around.

Cincinnati police developed a new game plan Wednesday night to look for Dulle as well.

“We're using technology; we're using the public,” said Cincinnati Police Capt. Mike Neville. “I have an investigator assigned to that and that only right now. I met with (the investigator Tuesday) night and (Wednesday) morning. We are ironing out what could be good leads.”

Police said Wednesday night that Texas Equusearch, a nation-wide search and recovery team, will help in the hunt for Dulle. Texas Equusearch provides experienced volunteer search efforts to reconnect missing persons with their loved ones.

Dave Rader, the director of Texas Equusearch's Ohio chapter, said he hopes to help guide Dulle's family in the right direction.

"To me it's a positive and that means we are looking for a live Brogan," he said. "To me, that's encouraging."

Earlier the Dulle family issued a statement, thankful for the outreach of family, police, and strangers.

We would like to thank everyone who has searched, posted, shared or tweeted in our efforts to find Brogan, including those who love him and know what a wonderful and caring young man he is,"

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