Clay Shrout in prison photo
Hide Caption

Clay Shrout: Florence teen killed his parents, sisters in their home almost 20 years ago

a a a a
Share this story
Show Related Headlines
Related Articles
Teen journal reveals plot to kill parents

FLORENCE, Ky. – If Thursday's news of a local teen allegedly trying to kill his parents in their home sounds familiar, you might be thinking of Clay Shrout.

Shrout was a high school junior, like the 16-year-old accused in the Butler County house fire Wednesday night. But Shrout’s deed was even more horrible.

He killed his whole family.

It was almost 20 years ago: May 26, 1994. Shrout, 17, got up early, about 5 a.m., and shot his mother and father while they slept in their upscale Florence house. Then he walked down the hallway and shot his sisters, ages 14 and 12, after they woke up, he said in a police interview.

Shrout then drove to the house of a girl he had taken to the prom two weeks earlier. He showed her the gun, grabbed her by the arm and walked her to his Jeep.

Then he went to school.

He walked into his first class at Ryle High, showed the trigonometry teacher the gun, and sat down at her desk.

He silently held the teacher, 22 classmates and his kidnapped prom date hostage for about 10 minutes, until an assistant principal knocked on the door and offered to trade places with them.

Shrout let the others go and gave up the gun about five minutes later when the first police officer arrived at the door.

Shrout later told police he was mad at his parents for taking away his weapons because he was flunking English.

Shrout had a stun gun, a sword, knives, numchucks and a BB gun, but there were no reports that he ever threatened anyone with them. A few days before killing his family, he had taken the stun gun to school and an assistant principal had confiscated it.

He told police there were two reasons she shot his sisters.

"The first one was I didn't want them to have to live without their parents," he said. "And also my older sister, she had enough intelligence to pick up the phone and call the police.”

Shrout pleaded guilty by reason of insanity and was sentenced to life with parole after 25 years.

He is eligible for parole in 2019.

See more at Kentucky Online Offender Lookup at http://kool.corrections.ky.gov/KOOL/Details/233951

Copyright 2013 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Print this article

Comments

Hmm... It looks like you’re not a WCPO Insider. or Subscribe now to contribute!

More Local News
LIVE: Follow Boone County Judge Executive debate
LIVE: Follow Boone County Judge Executive debate

Follow the debate between Boone County Judge Executive candidates Gary Moore and J. Kyle Sweeney. 

Procter & Gamble 3rd-quarter results mixed
Procter & Gamble 3rd-quarter results mixed

Procter & Gamble Co.'s fiscal third-quarter net income rose 2 percent, bolstered by some lower expenses and a reduced tax rate.

Local leaders voice support for Ohio's Issue 1
Local leaders voice support for Ohio's Issue 1

A group of Cincinnati area officials and business leaders are coming together Wednesday to support a statewide project.

Tri-State briefs: April 23, 2014
Tri-State briefs: April 23, 2014

A wrap-up of local stories happening Wednesday, April 23, 2014.

Cincinnati traffic: Wednesday's delays
Cincinnati traffic: Wednesday's delays

All your Wednesday morning traffic delays.

Mann: New bike path plan will save parking spots
Mann: New bike path plan will save parking spots

The debate over a new downtown bike path took a turn Tuesday evening when Vice Mayor David Mann offered a compromise to keep the future path…

New Miami votes to fire police chief
New Miami votes to fire police chief

The Village of New Miami fired its police chief, Kenneth Cheek, Tuesday night.

Reds ease by struggling Pirates 4-1
Reds ease by struggling Pirates 4-1

Johnny Cueto tossed his second three-hitter against the Pittsburgh in a week and the Cincinnati Reds eased past the struggling Pirates 4-1 on…

Tri-Staters saving the planet and their wallets
Tri-Staters saving the planet and their wallets

Earth Day is an annual celebration of our planet and a reminder of the things we can do to keep it safe and healthy.

Some Catholics, teachers protest morality clause
Some Catholics, teachers protest morality clause

Thousands of teachers, parents and parishioners oppose the morality clause within the Archdiocese of Cincinnati's teacher contract and…