Duke Energy crews repair downed power lines on Taylor Pike in Clermont County on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Terry Helmer
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MAY 24, 2011 - Wires down Yankee Road in Liberty Township Deb Silverman
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MAY 24, 2011 - Tree down on Reid Avenue in College Hill Dwayne Slavey
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MAY 23, 2011 - Tree down in College Hill on Reid Avenue. Rick Newell
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Photo submitted by Brian J. Pio.
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Severe weather in the Tri-State on Monday, May 23, 2011.
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Storms knock out power across Tri-State

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CINCINNATI - Thousands of people across the Tri-State are still without power after storms rolled through the region Monday evening.

At one point more than 108,000 Duke Energy customers were in the dark. Most of those without power are in Butler, Clermont and Hamilton counties.

As of 7:15 p.m. Tuesday, over 4,000 people were still without power. A majority of those in the dark are in Hamilton County. To see current power outages visit http://www.duke-energy.com/ohio/outages/current.asp .

A Duke spokesperson says they expect to have power fully restored to everyone by Wednesday at noon. They have setup a staging area at Eastgate Mall to try and serve customers faster.

For the latest forecast go to http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/weather/forecast/todays_forecast/Your-Latest-Forecast .

Duke Energy asks anyone who loses power to call (800)543-5599.

Customers of Owen Electric are asked to call (800) 372-7612 to report an outage.

Report an outage with South Central Power Company by calling (877) 688-2437. People are urged to stay away from downed trees and power lines and to treat intersections where lights are out as a four-way stops.

With widespread power outages in the area, health officials have these tips for residents and food service facilities on how to handle food during power outages.

At home

If power is out at your home, do not open refrigerator(s) or freezer(s). Without power, a combination refrigerator/freezer will keep food cool for four hours, if left closed. Upright or chest freezers will keep food frozen:

- 48 hours if full
- 24 hours if half-full

Food may be kept safe by using coolers and burying perishable food items in ice or dry ice. If your power has been out for longer than four hours, perishable food such as meat, poultry or dairy is not safe to eat and should be discarded. Before consuming items, check them with a food thermometer. Food items over 41 degrees should not be eaten.

Health officials stress to never taste food to determine its safety. "When in doubt, throw it out."

At the restaurant, market or other food service facility

If your business loses power, stop serving food and close. Do not open refrigerator or freezer holding units. When power returns check all food temperatures. If cold foods are above 41 degrees discard immediately.

Residents should use caution when patronizing restaurants that appear to be operating without power.

To get the latest weather, news and traffic on your mobile device go to http://www.wcpo.com/subindex/about_us/mobile.

Copyright Copyright 2011 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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