Invasives equal problems at home

A few tips to keep in mind

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Avoiding Invasives

Invasive species – those that are not native to a specific region – often grow fast, spread easily and displace native species. Invasives come in many shapes and sizes, negatively impacting wildlife diversity and the health of an ecosystem.

·         Invasive weeds can reduce crop yield and compete with native forage plants in pastures, reducing food available for cattle.

·         Tiny invasive mites threaten honeybees, which are important for plant pollination and fruit production.

·         Forests pests like the Asian long-horned beetle can destroy maples and other hardwood trees.

·         Perennial plants like purple loosestrife, which was introduced from Europe in the 1800s, can take over entire wetland habitats, choking out other plants and covering up open water.

Viewer Tips: Invasive species can spread when they "hitchhike" on humans, pets and vehicles. As the weather warms up and you spend more time outside, keep these tips in mind to reduce the spread of invasive plants and animals:

·         Always stay on designated trails and roads. Wash your gear and car after a trip to remove any seeds you may have picked up.

·         Check yourself and your pets for "hitchhikers" and remove them before returning home.

·         Wash boats, gear and vehicles after spending time on the water. Remove plants from boats, motors and trailers and throw them away before heading home. Drain live wells, bilge water and transom wells at the boat launch before you leave.

Additional Information:

The United States National Arboretum is an excellent source for more information. Once again, a thanks to  Earth Gauge.

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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