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Lakota West freshman school student commits suicide

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WEST CHESTER, Ohio - It was a solemn day Friday for students at Lakota West freshman school. A teenage girl committed suicide earlier this week and her classmates and their parents are trying to find ways to deal with that tragedy.

Suicide is a sensitive topic, but it is the third leading cause of death in the United States for young people between the ages of 15 and 24.

9 News talked to parents who say they want to know more. They want to have the information that could keep them from the grief of having to bury a child.

A letter did go out to parents this week at Lakota West freshman school notifying them of the incident. The school had crisis counselors on hand to help students deal with their grief.

Some students have posted messages on Facebook and even produced musical tributes to honor the young student on Youtube.

What's important to know is that help is available in Butler County and throughout the Tri-State. Crisis counselors will come to your home or school in a life and death emergency.

"We're getting a lot more calls from the schools," said Cassandra von Gerds, Butler County CCI program manager. "The school are reaching out to us indicating hey, we have someone who is possibly thinking about harming themselves or they're starting to talk about it. What do we do from here or we need some more assistance and then we go out and we reach out to those people, work with family, work with students."

Some suicide warning signs are:

  • Mood changes, mood swings
  • Changes in eating patterns
  • Changes in clothing appearance
  • Cutting off communication

If your child comes home and says they're having a bad day but won't talk about it, experts say get him or her to talk.

And, if you believe you need help, the number to call is 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433).

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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