Photo Video
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Hide Caption

Sentence in Texas teen's fatal DWI wreck stirs ire

a a a a
Share this story

FORT WORTH, Texas -- A North Texas teen from an affluent family received a probation-only sentence this week for losing control of his pickup truck while drunk and killing four pedestrians, a punishment that has outraged the victims' families and left prosecutors disappointed.

The 16-year-old boy was sentenced Tuesday in a Fort Worth juvenile court to 10 years of probation after he confessed to intoxication manslaughter in the June 15 crash on a dark rural road.

Prosecutors had sought the maximum 20 years in state custody for the Keller teen, but his attorneys appealed to state District Judge Jean Boyd that he needed rehabilitation instead of imprisonment, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported.

Authorities said the teen and friends were seen on surveillance video stealing two cases of beer from a store. He had seven passengers in his Ford F-350, was speeding and had a blood-alcohol level three times the legal limit, according to testimony during the trial. His pickup truck slammed into the four pedestrians, killing Brian Jennings, 43-year-old Burleson youth minister; Breanna Mitchell of Lillian, 24; Shelby Boyles, 21, and her 52-year-old mother, Hollie Boyles.

If the boy, who is from an affluent family, continued to be cushioned by his family's wealth and another tragedy is likely in his future, prosecutor Richard Alpert said in court.

"There can be no doubt that he will be in another courthouse one day blaming the lenient treatment he received here," he said.

Boyd said the programs available in the Texas juvenile justice system may not provide the kind of intensive therapy the teen could receive at a rehabilitation center near Newport Beach, Calif., that was suggested by his defense attorneys. The parents would pick up the tab for the center, which runs more than $450,000 a year for treatment.

Scott Brown, the boy's lead defense attorney, said the teen could have been freed after two years if he had drawn the 20-year sentence.

"(The judge) fashioned a sentence that could have him under the thumb of the justice system for the next 10 years," he told the Star-Telegram.

Survivors of those killed in the accident drew little comfort from that assurance.

Eric Boyles lost his wife and daughter, and said the family's wealth helped the teen avoid incarceration.

"Money always seems to keep you out of trouble," Boyles said. "Ultimately today, I felt that money did prevail. If you had been any other youth, I feel like the circumstances would have been different."

Shaunna Jennings, the widow of the minister, said her family had forgiven the teen but believed a sterner punishment was needed.

"You lived a life of privilege and entitlement, and my prayer is that it does not get you out of this," she said. "My fear is that it will get you out of this."

A psychologist called as an expert defense witness said the boy suffered from "affluenza," growing up in a house where parents were preoccupied with arguments with each other that led to a divorce.

The father "does not have relationships, he takes hostages," psychologist Gary Miller said, and the mother was indulgent. "Her mantra was that if it feels good, do it," he said.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Print this article

Comments

Hmm... It looks like you’re not a WCPO Insider. or Subscribe now to contribute!

More National News
Advice to Democrats: Don't say `recovery'
Advice to Democrats: Don't say `recovery'

Election-year memo to Democratic candidates: Don't talk about the economic recovery. It's a political loser.

Police: Man ate pot candy before shooting wife
Police: Man ate pot candy before shooting wife

A Denver man accused of killing his wife while she was on the phone with a 911 dispatcher ate marijuana-infused candy before the attack,…

Town honors 15 killed in year-ago explosion
Town honors 15 killed in year-ago explosion

Rev. Terry McElrath heard the deafening boom. The pastor spun around and saw a column of smoke billowing into the sky above his small Texas…

Late sign-ups improve outlook for health law
Late sign-ups improve outlook for health law

A surge of eleventh-hour enrollments has improved the outlook for President Barack Obama's health care law, with more people signing up…

Student struggles to recount fatal bus crash
Student struggles to recount fatal bus crash

Most of the 911 calls from witnesses to last week's fiery truck-bus collision that killed 10 were matter of fact.

White House updating online privacy policy
White House updating online privacy policy

A new Obama administration privacy policy released Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to…

Remembering a cop slain after bombs went off
Remembering a cop slain after bombs went off

Like many other youngsters, Sean Collier wanted to be a police officer. Unlike most, he brought that dream to life - and then died doing it,…

Chelsea Clinton expecting first child this fall
Chelsea Clinton expecting first child this fall

or the Clintons, 2014 is the year of the baby.

Study: Girls view sexual violence as normal
Study: Girls view sexual violence as normal

New research from the journal Gender & Society shows girls view sexual violence as a normal part of life.

Mother of 3 shot, killed while on phone with 911
Mother of 3 shot, killed while on phone with 911

A 44-year-old mother of three was shot to death by her "hallucinating" husband while she was on the phone with 911, waiting for…