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Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre report to be released Monday

A local family remains hopeful after losing niece

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Tragedy at Sandy Hook

A summary report detailing the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown will be publicly released Monday.

Although the report on the investigation into the mass shooting will be released on Monday, the public will have to wait to see the state's full police report, according to the Associated Press.

The state police report is said to exceed 1,000 pages. No date is set on when the full police report will be released.

In the wake of the one year anniversary of the tragedy at Sandy Hook, a local family remains hopeful.

Todd and Michelle Bacon lost their 6-year-old niece, Charlotte, in the December 14 massacre. 

ABC reported that Charlotte wore a new pink dress and boots to school the day of the shootings. They were meant to be worn during the holidays, her mother said.

This year, her family remembers her as the holidays approach. 

"While grief for our family continues, we remain hopeful and profoundly thankful to so many who have been moved by sorrow to honor Charlotte's life though acts of kindness," said the Bacons. 

Todd teaches at Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy and Michelle serves as a pastor at Montgomery Presbyterian Church.

Charlotte's family has set up a website, NewtownKindness, to promote kindness and compassion.

"May each of us be inspired by organizations such as NewtownKindness and children around the world who show us adults the way forward through their simple and genuine expressions of trust and kindness," said the Bacons.

More: Remembering Charlotte

The summary report by the lead investigator, State's Attorney Stephen Sedensky III, could provide some of the first official answers to questions about the history of the gunman and the police response to one of the worst school shootings in American history.

The Dec. 14 shooting plunged the small New England community into mourning, elevated gun safety to the top of the agenda for President Barack Obama and led states across the country to re-evaluate laws on issues including school safety.

The report expected Monday afternoon will not include the full evidence file of Connecticut State Police, which is believed to total thousands of pages. The decision to continue withholding the bulk of the evidence is stirring new criticism of the secrecy surrounding the investigation.

Dan Klau, a Hartford attorney who specializes in First Amendment law, said the decision to release a summary report before the full evidence file is a reversal of standard practice and one of the most unusual elements of the investigation.

"What I found troubling about the approach of the state's attorney is that from my perspective, he seems to have forgotten his job is to represent the state of Connecticut," Klau said. "His conduct in many instances has seemed more akin to an attorney in private practice representing Sandy Hook families."

Sedensky said he could not comment.

RELATED: Remembering Sandy Hook Elementary Victims

Twenty-year-old Adam Lanza killed his mother inside their Newtown home before driving to his former elementary school, where he fired off 154 shots with a Bushmaster .223-caliber rifle within five minutes. He killed himself with a handgun as police arrived.

Warrants released in March detailed an arsenal of weapons found inside the Lanza home. But authorities have not provided details on the police response to the shooting, any mental health records for Lanza and whether investigators found any clues to a possible motive for the rampage.

Sedensky has gone to court to fight release of the 911 tapes from the school and resisted calls from Connecticut's governor to divulge more information sooner.

The withholding of 911 recordings, which are routinely released in other cases, has been the subject of a legal battle between The Associated Press and Sedensky before the state's Freedom of Information Commission, which ruled in favor of the AP, and now Connecticut's court system. A hearing is scheduled Monday in New Britain Superior Court on whether the judge can hear the recordings as he considers an appeal.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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