Komen president resigning, founder shifting roles

DALLAS (AP) -- The president of Susan G. Komen for the Cure is resigning and founder Nancy Brinker is moving away from its day-to-day management, the nation's largest breast cancer foundation said Wednesday as fallout from its brief decision to end funding for Planned Parenthood reaches the organization's highest ranks.

President Liz Thompson will leave Komen next month and Brinker will relinquish her chief executive's role for one more focused on fundraising and strategic planning, according to a statement from the Dallas-based organization.

It's the latest shakeup since news emerged in January that Komen had decided to eliminate its funding for Planned Parenthood for breast-cancer screening. Komen reversed that decision after a three-day firestorm, though that didn't quell the criticism.

At least five other high-ranking executives resigned earlier this year.

Brinker founded the organization in 1982, two years after her sister, Susan G. Komen, died of breast cancer. Thompson joined the group in 2008 to head research and scientific programs, and she was promoted her to president in 2010.

According to the statement, which makes no reference to the Planned Parenthood decision or fallout, Thompson said the time was right for her to pursue other opportunities. She hailed the organization's leadership in pursuing a cure for breast cancer and for helping women and men with cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment.

"That legacy will continue. It has been a privilege and an honor to serve in this role," she said.

Brinker praised Thompson's work in expanding Komen's influence in scientific, community health, advocacy and global programs. "Liz's expertise and steady hand have helped us build on already outstanding programs, and we wish her well in her future endeavors," Brinker said.
 

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