A woman described by lawmakers and aides as a long-time House stenographer has been removed from the chamber during a vote after she began shouting. ABC
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House stenographer screams during shutdown vote, removed from chamber

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WASHINGTON -- A woman described by lawmakers and aides as a long-time House stenographer has been removed from the chamber during a vote after she began shouting.

The woman was yelling from the rostrum Wednesday just below where the House presiding officer sits. The microphone she was yelling into was off.

Lawmakers said she was yelling about the House being divided and the devil. Texas Democratic Rep. Joaquin Castro said she had a crazed look on her face.

As she was led into an elevator by security, she was heard to shout, "This is not one nation under God. It never was."

She also screamed, "Praise be to God, Lord Jesus Christ."

The outburst occurred while the House was voting on legislation ending the government shutdown and extending the federal debt limit.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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