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Website: University of Cincinnati among 'most dangerous' universities in United States

UC ranked 13th in the poll by BusinessInsider.com

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CINCINNATI - College is hard enough without having to worry about serious crime. Yet crime is a reality on and around many college campuses around the country.

According to the FBI's Uniform Crime Report , there were 2,696 identified violent crime incidents and 87,160 property crime incidents on and around U.S. college campuses in 2011.

BusinessInsider.com put together a list of the 25 most crime-riddled universities around the country using data FBI data from 2008 to 2011 for schools with enrollment over 10,000. Schools were ranked based on a combination of violent crime statistics and property crime statistics, with violent crime weighted four times higher.

While it might come as a surprise of some (and not to others), the University of Cincinnati ranked 13th on the list.

According to the figures tabulated by the FBI, UC averaged 23 violent crimes incidents on its campus each year between 2008 and 2011. There were approximately 558 property crime incidents per year during that same time on the campus of more than 32,000 students.

The website did note that the University of Cincinnati saw a major drop in violent crimes in 2011, down to 19 after an alarming 49 in 2010. Property crime was down too, the website noted, but the crimes were still high compared to the national average, the website commented (the website did not list the most recent property crime figures).

With an increasing number of shootings and robberies around UC's campus, Cincinnati's Police Chief is weighing in. Chief James Craig says he thinks the school should take a page from other urban universities and become more closed off to the public. He also made some suggestions about improving lighting around campus in a recent meeting with UC President Santa Ono.

The report was released just days after a recent fatal shooting just off campus, as well as some thefts and other minor crimes. UC has a campus alert system, and within minutes of last week's deadly shooting, a message from campus public safety was sent out via email, social media, and cell phones.

Ball State University in Indiana came in at No. 11 on the list. The university has averaged nine violent crimes and 353 property crime incidents per year during the period. Last year was a particularly dangerous year on the Muncie, Ind. campus, with 26 violent crimes and 376 property crimes. Indiana State, which was ranked 12th, saw an alarming 236 larceny incidents in 2011, among other property crimes. The Terre Haute, Ind. campus of nearly 12,000 students saw nine violent crimes and 214 property crimes on average between 2008 and 2011.

According to the website's findings, UCLA is the "most dangerous campus in the country." The University of California – Berkley, Duke, Florida A&M and Vanderbilt round out the top five schools on the list.

The website made sure to point out that some people have objected to its use of FBI data because (1) not all schools participate in the survey and (2) some schools are more aggressive than others in reporting crime in neighboring non-campus areas.

Website disclaimer:

In response to criticism, we prepared an alternate list based on on-campus crimes tracked for the Clery Act. We are happy to report, however, that this alternate ranking produced remarkably similar results — suggesting that both lists are good at identifying dangerous colleges. For instance, two schools which objected vocally to our original list — UCLA and UC-Riverside — were also named among the most dangerous colleges based on this new data set.

We have included responses submitted by various schools on their respective slides.

For more information on the survey go to http://www.businessinsider.com/most-dangerous-colleges-in-america-2012-11?op=1#ixzz2Dg3TLpDO

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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