Photo Video
Flying Pig Marathon 2012
Hide Caption
Flying Pig Marathon 2012
Hide Caption
Prev
Flying Pig Marathon increases security Flying Pig Marathon announces changes
Next

Flying Pig officials, police make changes ahead of marathon in response to Boston Marathon bombings

a a a a
Share this story

CINCINNATI - In response to the Boston Marathon tragedy, officials with the Flying Pig Marathon and police are making changes ahead of this year's race.

On Monday, more than 170 people were injured and three killed after two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

A shootout in downtown Boston late Thursday night resulted in the death of a police officer and one of the bombing suspects, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

The entire city of Boston remained on lockdown until late Friday evening when police apprehended 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Tamerlan's brother and suspected accomplice.

Cincinnati Police Chief James Craig told 9 On Your Side Friday the Flying Pig Marathon will be a secure event. He said the FBI will be assisting Cincinnati police for the duration of the marathon in addition to having extra security from the Ohio State Patrol. 

Flying Pig officials are also taking extra precautions by asking participants to place their belongings in clear bags. If they do not have one, clear bags will be distributed at the day of the race.

The Flying Pig will have a transport plan for participants so they will have their dry clothes waiting for them at the finish line. 

Organizers also ask runners and spectators to limit the number of bags or backpacks they bring to the event.

"If you're on the street [and] you have on a bag, you could be subject to search," said Iris Simpson, executive director of the Flying Pig. "We're going to have that much additional precaution and safety so it will become an inconvenience for you as well as everyone involved. If you bring a bag, don't leave it under a bench behind a tree or in a bush. We've seen a lot of that at previous Pigs. People are in a hurry and they go back and retrieve it later; it's not likely to be there so really leave your extra items at home."

If a large scale crisis were to unfold in Cincinnati, both police and fire officials say that the response would depend on the type of emergency.

In the past, the Cincinnati Fire Department issued directives to residents both for the styrene leak in the East End and the Queen City barrel fire to "shelter in place."

When enforced, "shelter in place" directs residents to stay indoors and is designed to protect residents from breathing harmful chemicals that may be present in the air.

"If it's primarily an inhalation hazard where people need to be protected from whatever the chemical is, that's when we might ask people to remain in their homes until the cloud has passed by and the air outside is safe again to breath," said Assistant Fire Chief Ed Dadosky.

The Cincinnati Police Department says officers are equipped with the skills to handle a lockdown situation. They often deal with barricaded suspects, during which they are forced to safely restrict certain areas.

"What they're doing in Boston is a request; they're requesting people to stay in for obvious reasons and if there were a similar situation here in Cincinnati we may do the same thing. It all depends on whether it's isolated or widespread," said Chief Craig.

Copyright 2013 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Print this article

Comments

Hmm... It looks like you’re not a WCPO Insider. or Subscribe now to contribute!

More On Boston Tragedy
Little government response a year later
Little government response a year later

A year after homemade bombs ripped through the Boston Marathon, state and federal officials have enacted virtually no policy changes in…

Boston bomb suspect pleads not guilty
Boston bomb suspect pleads not guilty

His arm in a cast, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to terrorism charges Wednesday in his first courtroom…

Alleged Boston bomber due in court
Alleged Boston bomber due in court

Survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing will watch as the young man who could face the death penalty for the attack appears in court for the…

Boston bombing suspect indicted
Boston bombing suspect indicted

A federal grand jury has returned a 30-count indictment against the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Boston bombing suspect is walking
Boston bombing suspect is walking

The remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings has recovered enough to walk and assured his parents in a phone conversation that he…

Man FBI shot spoke with bombing suspect
Man FBI shot spoke with bombing suspect

A Chechen immigrant shot to death in central Florida after an altercation with an FBI agent had several ties to that of one of the Boston…

Boston Marathon bomb suspect buried
Boston Marathon bomb suspect buried

The body of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was entombed in an unknown gravesite Thursday after police said an anonymous…

Boston runner asks for chance to finish
Boston runner asks for chance to finish

Runners who couldn't complete this year's Boston Marathon because of the bombings at the finish line have created an online petition asking…

Boston wasn't told of Tsarnaev warning
Boston wasn't told of Tsarnaev warning

FBI agents did not tell Boston police they had receiving warnings from Russia's government in 2011 about suspected bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev…