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Gladys, the new baby gorilla at the Cincinnat Zoo, made her public debut Tuesday. (Photo by Ron Fischer/9 On Your Side)
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Gladys, the new baby gorilla at the Cincinnat Zoo, made her public debut Tuesday. (Photo by Ron Fischer/9 On Your Side)
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Gladys, the new baby gorilla at the Cincinnat Zoo, made her public debut Tuesday. (Photo by Ron Fischer/9 On Your Side)
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Gladys Stones is the newest member at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden.
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This is a photo of Gladys, a  gorilla at the Cincinnati Zoo.
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Cincinnati Zoo's baby gorilla makes public debut in outdoor exhibit

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CINCINNATI - The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden's new baby gorilla made her public debut in her outdoor exhibit Tuesday.

It's been a long haul for 3-month-old Gladys Stones , who has been raised by a team of eight human surrogates for the past few months after her transfer from a Texas zoo.

The human surrogates — who dress in furry vests and black clothing — have been rotating shifts feeding the gorilla, holding her up to their chest and carrying her on their back like a real gorilla mother.

Even though Gladys has moved to her outdoor home, the surrogates' jobs are not over yet. The human surrogates will spend time with her in the outdoor exhibit as part of Phase III of her "gorillafication." Surrogates will allow her to explore all areas of the outdoor yard, climbing trees and ducking into caves, to ensure Gladys is familiar with the yard and comfortable when she goes outdoors with her gorilla surrogate in the near future.

Using human surrogates as gorilla moms is a first for the Cincinnati Zoo, but it has been done several times across the country, said Cincinnati Zoo Primate Team Leader Ron Evans. The Columbus Zoo created the surrogate style being used with Gladys, but zoos across the country have worked together to determine the best way to care for the large animals, he added.

"They're so high profile and they require so much behavior management and detail that we all have to pull our resources to make sure we're doing the best we can for the animals," Evans said.

Gladys was born on Jan. 29 at Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas, where she was hand-reared by zookeepers because her mother displayed a lack of maternal care, according to a press release. Her mother, 14-year-old Kiazi, is on a breeding loan transfer from the Cincinnati Zoo.

The baby gorilla was named Gladys Stones as a way to pay homage to the animal's former home. She was also given the name "Stones" after the Stones family who cared for her before her arrival in the Tri-State.

For more information about Gladys and the Cincinnati Zoo, go to http://cincinnatizoo.org/blog/2013/04/29/baby-gorillas-public-debut/ . The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden is located at 3400 Vine St. and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily during fall, winter and spring. For more information, go to http://cincinnatizoo.org/ .

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