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Casino collapses in Cincinnati on Friday, Jan. 27, 2012.
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Update on the casino collapse in downtown Cincinnati on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012.
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City leaders discuss casino collapse in Cincinnati on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012.
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Casino construction may resume by the end of the week

Construction to be on parking garage

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CINCINNATI - Construction may resume on the Horseshoe Casino by the end of the week after a collapse Friday injured 13 construction workers, said the director of the Cincinnati's building and planning department.

The Chief building inspector Amit Ghosh met with members of City Council's Sub-Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure Tuesday morning to discuss the site construction and ongoing safety inspections.

Ghosh said while construction can't resume at the site of the collapse until all investigations are complete, crews may be able to resume construction at the parking garage, which is not connected to the collapse.

The job site for the $400 million project was shut down Friday after a structural collapse injured 13 employees of Jostin Concrete Construction, Inc.

One worker remains in serious condition at Bethesda North Hospital in Montgomery.

Also, the collapse will change the construction process, Ghosh said.

Council member Chris Seelbach questioned if there were possible shortcuts taken during construction.

"Was I right in hearing you say we're now requiring all of the beams to be connected regardless if it's associated with one pour or not but before we allowed them to pour in certain sections without those beams being connected fully to the other sections?," Seelbach asked.

Ghosh replied that the construction project, including the use of temporary beams being used as concrete is poured is a standard building method used today.

"The construction managers followed a certain procedure for temporary connections and he could do that at their own choosing at their own risk, but they have offered now to say no we will make permanent connections just to be safe and proceed with the construction," Ghosh replied.

Stay with 9 News and WCPO.com for updates as they become available.
 

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