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Charlie "Hotrod" Mounce, of Hotrod Charlie's Tattoo on Short Vine Street in Clifton gets a tattoo from artist Scot Winskye of Ink Well tattoo during the Gambling Rose tattoo convention at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. Kareem Elgazzar | WCPO Digital
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Are tattoos mainstream in the Tri-State?

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CINCINNATI -- It's not unusual to see a "tat" in Vogue or Vanity Fair. Twenty-three percent of Americans are inked. In the words of Vanity Fair, tattooing has passed "from the savage to the sailor, from the sailor to landsman."

They're hot, they're popular and millions follow them: Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga, Pitbull, and Justin Timberlake all part of the American Music Awards and all rocking body art. 

Kyle Shearer, 20, was getting his second tattoo while 9 On Your Side interviewed him. He said it's "kinda addicting, honestly." But he knows it's not always a good thing to have them on display.

"It depends who you're around I guess. If you're walking in for a job interview it's not cool to have tats," said Shearer.

The Cincinnati State Soccer Team was in the midst of a winning season when its captains decided they'd go together and get a tattoo.

"We decided to get it on the inside of our lips because we were told they would fade after about a year," said one of the coaches. But as luck would have it, his did not. Now the link left on his inner lip is standing in the way of his career.

"They told me that that was the only thing holding me back from joining the Army."

Tony Pero, the head piercer at Beelistic's Tattoos in Clifton, said the hype is real and social media is feeding the spread.

"Pinterest has been a big deal, it's definitely getting very trendy -- it's becoming a big thing," said Pero.

Miss Kansas broke barriers with her Army insignia, which is in honor of her father and the serenity prayer on her side.

According to a recent New York Times review, 61 percent of human resource managers say a visible tattoo could hurt your job prospects.

While it's mainstream on the coasts, 9 On Your Side wanted to know what the pros think about our area.

Stephanie, like many others, ran out on her 18th birthday and got a tattoo. She doesn't look at it as much of a present now.

"I am definitely not the same person that I was when I was 18. The 26-year-old me does not think this is so awesome anymore," said Stephanie.

Stephanie and Cody are both getting their tattoo's removed at Re.You Studio in Hyde Park. Depending on the color, size and if it was professionally inked, a tattoo could take from five to 10 laser sessions to remove.

After five sessions Stephanie's tattoo is almost gone.

They both said it's relatively painless and for Cody it's a second chance.

For many, having a tattoo is just personal, like musician Jason Derulo, who was visiting Children's Hospitals this week for the opening of Seacrest Studios.

"I got this one right after my accident, shows that I'm a fighter," said Derulo.

Derulo said he's lucky to be alive after he fractured his neck during a rehearsal for his show.

"I think it definitely gives some people closure and it gives them a remembrance of something positive as opposed to something negative -- like something like breast cancer, autism tattoos, things like that. It definitely depending on what it is can make you feel better about it," said Pero.

So how casual is business casual when it comes to body art?

Most companies have a policy on visible tattoos. 9 On Your Side did some digging and found that companies have a right to ban employees with tattoos.

Hiring managers suggest covering up for your interview. While some dress codes are more relaxed, companies still expect candidates to look professional in an interview.

Click here to see tattoos around the Tri-State.

Copyright 2013 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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