A pharmacist shows a box containing a 'morning-after pill' in a pharmacy in Madrid, Spain. The emergency contraceptive product was made available over the counter with no age limit at Spanish pharmacies in 2009. (Photo by Jasper Juinen/Getty Images)
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Timeline of decisions on morning-after pill

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A federal judge has ruled that there should be no age restrictions on the sale of the morning-after pill. A timeline of decisions on the emergency contraception now sold as Plan B One-Step.

1999: The Food and Drug Administration approves prescription sales of Plan B.

2006: The FDA approves non-prescription sales for women 18 and older. Younger women would need a doctor's prescription. Because of the age limit, the contraception is behind pharmacy counters, so consumers have to ask for it rather than picking it up off the shelves.

2009: U.S. District Judge Edward Korman in New York orders the FDA to lower the age restrictions to 17.

2011: Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius overrules FDA and bars over-the-counter sales of the morning-after pill. She says young girls shouldn't be able to buy emergency contraception on their own.

2013: Korman rules that the age restrictions on over-the-counter sales of the morning-after pill are "arbitrary, capricious and unreasonable" and must end within 30 days.

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