Dog deaths in Cincinnati: Pet Spot says tests have not determined cause of violent illness

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Violent illness killing Tri-State dogs

NORWOOD,  Ohio – Operators of the doggie daycare connected to three dog deaths say tests have not determined what caused the violent illness that killed them and they plan to keep that part of their facility closed until Monday, Aug. 26.

The Pet Spot in Norwood posted this message on its Facebook page Monday night:

"All of the veterinarian infectious disease tests have come back negative.

"Independent laboratory test results looking for the usual causes of gastro intestinal issues have come back negative.

"We have had our food and water tested and the results came back clean, showing no issues.

"None of the food consumed was on the pet food recall list.

"In addition to our usual multi daily sanitation, the facility has been completely sanitized numerous times and our daycare floors have been stripped and resurfaced."

The Pet Spot temporarily shut down its doggie daycare Friday after four dogs it handled became ill, owner Jeff Voepel said in a Facebook post last week. At the time, he said he hoped to reopen the day care Tuesday.

Boarding and grooming have continued in the meantime.

"We are still waiting on results from the Ohio Veterinarians Office," the latest Facebook post says. "We are expecting to have these final test results later this week. Therefore, to ensure the safety of our pets to the best of our ability, our daycare will remain closed until we receive these results."

The Ohio Department of Agriculture had not received any test results and had not heard about any new cases of illness or death since last week, ODA spokesperson Erica Hawkins said Monday. Hawkins said tests were being conducted at Ohio State University. 

MedVet of Cincinnati, which treated the ill dogs and referred the cases to Ohio State, did not return phone calls from WCPO Digital.

The dead dogs had bloody diarrhea and violent vomiting, Hawkins said. She said owners who see those symptoms should take their dogs to the vet immediately.

The symptoms could indicate a severe illness known as HGE (hemorrhagic gastroenteritis).

Some Facebook posters wondered if there was a connection with P&G's pet food recall last week. P&G said some specific lots of Eukanuba and IAMS dry dog foods might be contaminated with salmonella, which can cause bloody diarrhea and vomiting.

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