Double Stuf Oreos not double stuffed? A high school math assignment reveals cookies short on cream

For 38 years, Nabisco’s Double Stuf Oreo has been satisfying sugar cravings everywhere, under the guise of having twice as much cream as the original Oreo. 

But a group of high schoolers have discovered that customers aren’t exactly getting what they paid for, according to ABC News.

Students entrusted with the task of determining whether Double Stuf and Mega Stuf Oreos were really double and mega stuffed did the math, and it turns out the numbers don’t add up.

Upstate New York math teacher Dan Anderson teaches a class for struggling math students, so he prefers hands-on activities as a way of helping students to understand.

The students took 10 regular Oreos, 10 Double Stuf Oreos and 10 Mega Stuf Oreos, then used equations to determine the cream content.

Double Stuf Oreos only had 1.86 times the cream of a regular Oreo. And Mega Oreos only had 2.68 times the cream.

Anderson published the results on his website, Recursiveprocess.com.

The Oreo revelation comes a few months after Subway was sued for selling customers “foot-long” subs that weren’t really a foot long. News of Subway’s advertisement deception became global conversation after a viral Facebook photo of a foot-long sub next to a ruler proved to only be 11 inches. 

Anderson's students' discovery comes on the heels of online outrage directed at Subway Australia earlier this year when a customer posted a photo on Facebook of his foot-long sub next to a tape measure to prove it fell an inch short.

Subway’s response was foot-long was a "descriptive name for the sub sold in Subway Restaurants and not intended to be a measurement of length."

ABC News reached out to Oreos, but they haven’t received a response.

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